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Posts Tagged ‘vegetable gardens’

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In contrast to last weekend’s cold, wintry weather,  this weekend was balmy and spring-like.  I took advantage of the sunny conditions and let my seedlings sit outside for the day.  They loved the sun!

Everything seems to be growing nicely.   The peppers, pictured above, are getting big enough to transplant to larger containers.

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Last weekend, I moved the first flat of tomatoes to larger pots and gave them a dose of fish emulsion.  It looks like the seedlings have already doubled in size.  The second flat of tomatoes, started last weekend, are already sprouting.

I also started a flat of squash last week, and the zucchini, below, is beginning to appear.

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My snow peas and sugar snaps had grown so big, I just had to transplant them.  They are now living in pots, pictured below.

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Next weekend, I’ll start some green beans and eggplant.  And if I’m really brave, I’ll start the purple hull peas.

Until then, I’m hoping the rain lets up some so I can get in the garden beds to weed and dig in the cover crop so I’ll have somewhere to plant all these lovely seedlings!

 

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Today while perusing Facebook, I saw a link to an article about a resident who was fighting his city over whether he could keep his front-yard garden.

According to the article, the city viewed the garden as a “blot on the landscape” and demanded that he convert his garden to sod. With the help of a lawyer, the resident appealed the citation against him and won.

The article goes on to quote a city official who said that, while the resident had the law on his side, it didn’t make sense to have a front-yard garden. After all, everyone knows gardens belong in the back yard, right?

I had several reactions when I read the article, the first being, “You go, gardener!” Followed by noting that his garden looks much neater than mine!

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The photo above shows one view of my front-yard garden. A view coming from the other direction:

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Now my yard is a bit different than the Missouri resident’s, mainly because I have a row of crepe myrtles crossing the front. In the spring, the trees are surrounded by tulips, iris, and wildflowers, creating a show of pastels for the passers-by.

I’ve also planted flowers all along the perimeter to shield the deer fence and add some color:

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Another thought I had when reading the article was this: While it might be traditional to have your veggies out back, what if, like me, your back yard is not sunny enough to grow summer veggies?

And why should someone grow sod when they can instead have a garden to feed their family? When I visited Ireland and Peru, I was impressed with how many rural landowners made the best of their space, including having gardens and animals in all areas of their yards.

The city official was concerned about how the garden would look in the winter. I don’t know what that gardener plans to do, but I plant cover crop. Last year’s clover received rave reviews from the people walking by my house.

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I don’t know if the resident lived in an area that has a homeowner association with rules on landscaping. I don’t live in such an area, so I am free to do what I want with my yard.

And while it might not be to everyone’s taste, my garden looks beautiful to me. It brings me joy — and lots of produce and cut flowers!

Besides, I’m not sure a sodded yard could compare to the beauty I see in a homegrown tomato.

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