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Posts Tagged ‘sleep’

 

 

 

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I love taking pictures of my dog Meghan sleeping.   She is quite the active pup, but she also enjoys a good snooze on the couch, especially after a long day of playing at doggie day camp.  Here are some photos taken of her relaxing after her recent play day.

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The joy of napping

While visiting with some relatives last weekend, I got to talking to my cousin’s 4-year-old son, B. Here’s what I learned: B loves Annie’s macaroni and cheese; his older brother H  “won’t let him” play with cousin E; and he likes his school, but he hates nap time.

“Just wait until you’re my age, B,” I said, “and you’ll be wishing you had nap time!” B, like any self-respecting 4-year-old, looked at me blankly. If he were a few years older, he would have added the eye roll, and I don’t blame him. After all, who among us didn’t hate when our older relatives would say things like, “just you wait…” or “when I was your age…” or “my, how you’ve grown!”

B then went on to talk about some other very important things, like how he loves lemonade and Spiderman.  But his napping predicament made me think about how children will often fight sleep, even when they are really tired. It seems that, at their young ages, the world is full of new, exciting experiences, and they don’t want to miss out on any fun.    My niece L, pictured above, also puts up a valiant fight before nodding off.

Though I’m quite a few years older than B and L, even I can also find myself fighting the need to sleep — though not for the same reasons.

Well, to be honest, sometimes I struggle to stay awake so I can watch that all-important rivalry game conveniently scheduled at 9 p.m. on Wednesday nights.

But mostly I’m fighting sleep because I have to: it’s not acceptable to nod off at work. In fact, there’s a work rule specifically warning against such activity.  But should there be?

According to the National Sleep Foundation, “While naps do not necessarily make up for inadequate or poor quality nighttime sleep, a short nap of 20-30 minutes can help to improve mood, alertness and performance.”

An article on Salary.com lists nine reasons why you should nap at work.  Those reasons include: napping is good medicine, and napping helps boost the economy.    Why shop when you can nap?

Some folks, like my friend S, say they can’t nap during the day.  Others say they can nap, but need to have at least two hours for a good, long rest.   I am fortunate:  being from a long line of nappers, I can take 10- to 20-minute power naps (when not at work) and waken refreshed and invigorated.

Of course the ideal situation is to get a good night’s rest so a nap isn’t necessary.  I’m finding that seven hours is the magic number for me.  And because I get up at 5 a.m., that means being asleep at 10 p.m.   While I try to schedule my life so that I can get enough sleep, sometimes it just doesn’t work out.  Hence the need for a nap.

How about you?  How much sleep do you  need, and how much do you actually get?  Can you  nap, and, if so, can you nap at work?

 

 

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