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Posts Tagged ‘peas’

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In contrast to last weekend’s cold, wintry weather,  this weekend was balmy and spring-like.  I took advantage of the sunny conditions and let my seedlings sit outside for the day.  They loved the sun!

Everything seems to be growing nicely.   The peppers, pictured above, are getting big enough to transplant to larger containers.

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Last weekend, I moved the first flat of tomatoes to larger pots and gave them a dose of fish emulsion.  It looks like the seedlings have already doubled in size.  The second flat of tomatoes, started last weekend, are already sprouting.

I also started a flat of squash last week, and the zucchini, below, is beginning to appear.

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My snow peas and sugar snaps had grown so big, I just had to transplant them.  They are now living in pots, pictured below.

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Next weekend, I’ll start some green beans and eggplant.  And if I’m really brave, I’ll start the purple hull peas.

Until then, I’m hoping the rain lets up some so I can get in the garden beds to weed and dig in the cover crop so I’ll have somewhere to plant all these lovely seedlings!

 

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Spring in my garden brings blossoms of pink, purple and yellow. Tulips, crocus, daffodils, azaleas, and cornflowers all show off their bright colors.

But amidst the showy pastels are some amazing white flowers that more than hold their own. My white azaleas have been especially beautiful this year.

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I don’t have dogwoods in my yard, but they grow wild in the woods around my house.

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Dogwoods make me happy! Maybe next fall, I’ll remember to buy a few dogwoods to plant in my back “field.”

Other plants, like the arugula below, shoot up white flowers when they go to seed.

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While this batch of arugula is on its way out, the peas are on their way in.

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So are the blackberries!

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Spring also means breaking out the fish emulsion. It smells disgusting (even my six-year-old neighbor G. thinks so!), but the plants love it.

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Though the flowers make me happy, none can hold a candle to a certain white-faced friend.

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So when someone else’s dog bites (because my dog is very well behaved!) and the bee stings (because they are attracted to those white flowers!), I simply remember azaleas, dogwoods, peas, berries, and my sweet Nanaline, and then I don’t feel so bad! (Apologies to Rodgers and Hammerstein!)

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I woke up today and realized that spring break for the university where I work is about three weeks away.

During spring break, students are off sunning themselves on tropical islands, while I’m spending the week working in my yard. That means planting spring crops, as well as digging up new garden beds.

I planted some seeds last fall that are currently overwintering outside (chard, greens, broccoli raab, kohlrabi), but I really needed to get going on the peas.

I usually start a round of peas indoors and have them fairly tall and hardened off before spring break. This way, there’s less of a risk of the birds nibbling the tender shoots.

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So I pulled out four varieties of pea seeds: Corne De Belier and Mammoth Melting Sugar (snow peas) and Tall Telephone and Blue Podded Blauwschokkers (shelling peas).

Next, I filled my seed-starting trays with soil. My gardening partner, Patches, made it his mission to repeated knock against my arm right right as I was trying to place the seeds in the trays.

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He finally tired of that game and went to lie in the sun. I was then able to actually plant the seeds.

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After watering the trays, I moved them inside to the dining room table, where they will live for the next few weeks.

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I figure I’ll start harvesting peas in April and May. Until then, I’ll just have to enjoy a nice, comforting bowl of split pea soup.

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